Language revitalisation – an overview PDF Print E-mail

For present and future generations, communities consider recording, documenting, and publishing of language materials to be vitally important. Communities have been involved in producing a wide range of resources, such as dictionaries, grammars, language learning and teaching materials for the classroom. Further, communities are developing a broad range of experience in publishing various electronic as well as printed formats, including books, audio and video recordings, CD-ROMs and websites.

Increasingly, members of communities are undertaking training and receiving qualifications in the fields of linguistics, applied linguistics, language policy and planning, education and ICT; more and more they are working as academics, teachers, teacher aids, linguists, teacher-linguists, language workers, language specialists, web designers, software developers. Also, communities continue to find willing partners among non-Indigenous staff in schools, linguists and ICT specialists and consider them to be important collaborators and supporters in language revitalisation. Many consultants respond to this need with commitment and in generous ways. There is much work to be done and many people are very involved in this important work.