Language Worker Course - taking ownership of your language PDF Print E-mail

Language Worker Course
Language Worker Course
The Resource Network for Linguistic Diversity www.rnld.org recently began piloting its new Documenting and Revitalizing Indigenous Languages (DRIL) Training Program. DRIL is designed for Aboriginal and Islander people who want to develop, implement and manage their own language projects.

Participants can take part in the training individually, or with other people in  their family, a small group in a community, or in the workplace..The DRIL curriculum offers 29 modules in seven topics: Developing a language project, Recording and archiving, Strategies for language revival and maintenance, Creating language resources, literacy and linguistics, Publishing and presenting, and Training and curriculum development. Participants can choose any of the modules in these topics as a starting point. More information on the curriculum is available on RNLD's web site at www.rnld.org/node/71

DRIL is currently being piloted in eight language communities in WA, Queensland and Victoria. In 2011, we will begin working with two communities in NSW and include more languages in WA. If you're interested in taking part, please contact Margaret Florey on  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

The Resource Network for Linguistic Diversity is also part of the planning group for a new Consortium on Training in Language Documentation and Conservation. The CTLDC fosters networking and collaboration among people and organisations that support training in language documentation and promote the ongoing use of all of the world's languages. Asia-Pacific members of the planning group recently met in Japan to share information about their training activities and to develop the structure and goals of the consortium. Australia was represented by the Resource Network for Linguistic Diversity, Batchelor Institute for Indigenous Tertiary Education, Miromaa Aboriginal Language and Technology Centre, and the Pacific and Regional Archive for Digital Sources in Endangered Cultures. More information about the CTLDC is available on the web at

www.rnld.org/node/106.

Article by Margaret Florey