Alice Springs Institute covering a wide scope PDF Print E-mail

Taking studies outdoors, Year 8 students from Alice Springs High School at Emily's Gap.
Taking studies outdoors, Year 8 students from Alice Springs High School at Emily's Gap.
Just south of the town centre in Alice Springs, the Institute for Aboriginal Development sprawls across a peaceful site overlooking the river gums and saltbush, that line the banks of the Todd River. The 17 small brick and timber buildings housing the I.A.D. cry out for redevelopment, having multiplied over the past 30 years to form the home base, from which a diverse range of services are provided to the people of Central Australia.

The I.A.D was established by the Uniting Church in 1969, on the site chosen by local elders, as a place of learning for the community members.

Since that time, the Aboriginal controlled Language and Adult Education Centre has fulfilled its original aims, providing cross- cultural education, and assisting community development for Aboriginal people in the Central Australian region.

The teaching of Eastern and Central Arrernte is one of a number of fields being administered by the Language and Culture Centre at the Institute, under the Languages in Schools Program.

Over 220 primary and secondary students are now involved, with classes run in four of the local schools. The number of pupils has increased steadily since the Arremte program began in 1990.

The Aboriginal Translating and Interpreter Service (ATIS) is in regular demand, operating on a fee for service basis. Police, CIB, Courts, Government and non-Government and Indigenous organisations utilize the skills of the language specialists, in growing recognition of the difficulty of the language barrier for many people.

The Translating and Interpreter service has been in operation since 1973, when it was established by Yami Lester and Rev Jim Downing.

The ATIS provides supplementary workshops on "How to use an interpreter" for current and potential customers. These two hour courses are run free of charge.

IAD also incorporates one of Australia's three indigenous publishing centres, producing material relevant to all areas of indigenous culture and education, which is distributed Australia wide.

A list of publications can be obtained from IAD Press on 08 89511409

The Aboriginal Cultural Awareness Program (ACAP) presents informative programs on Central Australian Aboriginal cultures and experiences. Students are taken through subjects relating to interesting and diverse aspects of the culture, including;

  • Traditional and contemporary Aboriginal culture;
  • Ownership and care;
  • Interpretation of artforms;

Racism and the rules of kinship are addressed in the programs, components of which are designed specifically for the education of non-indigenous participants.

With its long and progressive history, the I.A.D. has a list of achievements well placed to support its plans for future development and growth.

More information on the services provided by the Institute for Aboriginal Development can be obtained by contacting the Institute on:
Ph. 08 89511311
Fax. 08 89537884