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Faith
Faith Baisden
LOSS of culture is something we hear a lot about. In some areas there are people who believe they have nothing left.

But I've been hearing lately from people who take positive steps to prove that history and traditions live on even where they're not expected.

Organisers of family and language group gatherings are bringing community members together, where in some cases there hasn't been any contact for years.

If you think of it, the members of a family living far away from their home community, mightn't know which of their habits are a result of cultural tradition, a little quirk that's been developed in your own household, or part of the new traditions of a blended culture.

But coming back together the stories start, the photos come out, old sayings are heard and recognised and someone else will comment on the fact that Uncle Walter never left his home if there was a full moon.

Piece by piece it comes together. And with it, comes pride and a sense of belonging. It's the way that history, culture and tradition live on.

Regards,
Faith Baisden