Language Teachers Graduate in Perth PDF Print E-mail
The course graduates are: Lola Hayward, Dawn Ugle, Sonny Graham, Maxine, Williams, Purtungana Bangu, Hazel Hobbs, Maureen Yanawana, Noeleen Bartlett, Edith Maher, Nora Ormerod, Rikki Papertalk, Lorraine Tuia, George Walley, Iris Woods, Kayleen Arnold, Nora Cooke and Janet Stewart
The course graduates are: Lola Hayward, Dawn Ugle, Sonny Graham, Maxine, Williams, Purtungana Bangu, Hazel Hobbs, Maureen Yanawana, Noeleen Bartlett, Edith Maher, Nora Ormerod, Rikki Papertalk, Lorraine Tuia, George Walley, Iris Woods, Kayleen Arnold, Nora Cooke and Janet Stewart
MORE West Australian students will be able to learn Aboriginal languages after seventeen Department of Education staff graduated from a training course in Perth recently. The group has completed the Department's Aboriginal Languages Teacher training Course this week, taking to 51 the number of people who have done the course since the program began in 1998.


The language course, taught in four modules over eighteen months, trains Aboriginal and Islander Education Officers (AIEOs),Aboriginal language specialists and Aboriginal teachers to teach their languages in government schools.

Acting Director-General Ron Mance said the teaching program formed part of the Department's commitment to preserving Aboriginal languages by ensuring they were taught in schools.

"The graduation is the culmination of an intensive training program and the list of participants includes staff from the Kimberley, the Pilbara, the Mid-West, and the South-West areas." he said.

Between them, the 17 participants speak eight languages — Juwaliny, Mangala, Ngarla, Noongar, Nyangumarta,Wajarri, Walmajarri and Wangkatha.They represent 15 government schools from around the State.

"These Aboriginal staff are all already teaching their own languages in our schools," Mr Mance said."The course gives them the skills to add to their expertise in the classroom."

It enables the teachers to move towards an outcomes focus in planning and teaching, and to develop the skills to utilise technology to produce a range of oral, visual and written teaching resources in their own languages.

Mr Mance said it was tremendously rewarding to see a third group of staff now graduate from what had been a very successful program.A fourth intake had already started their four-part course, in June this year.

"We have more and more schools wanting to teach Aboriginal languages all the time, so it's important that we have the numbers of teachers to keep up with demand," he said.

"This course is a vital tool in preserving the language of Indigenous Australians, and provides career options for Indigenous language speakers." Mr Mance said Aboriginal languages were among the priority languages for the Department.