Aurukun students tell the real story PDF Print E-mail

Aurukun students tell the real story
Aurukun students tell the real story
"We were unhappy with the article We know that there are lots of problems in Cape York Communities but in our class the kids come to school and work hard.

"We wanted to let people know that good things are happening in Aurukun and we are part of it.
"So as a class we sat down and talked about our ideas.Winnie Yunkaporta acted as scribe. Here are our thoughts."

Things we've done...
• work experience in Weipa and Thursday Island
• run our school parades
• attended leadership and technology camps
• attended Goodwill games
• audio taped Oral Histories in Aurukun with Partnership Group
• participated in Young Endeavor and Tribal Warrior visits in Aurukun and Weipa
• involved in CROC Festival: performing and production
• visited Cherbourg community
• assisted development of Aurukun Council and school Web sites
• participated in range of sporting events Including:
• AFL Kickstart Traineeships
• started a netball competition
• learn to swim program
• assisted running of BRACS radio station with broadcasts
• run 100% Drug Free discos throughout the year.

Aurukun students tell the real story
Aurukun students tell the real story
The pupils at Aurukun speak Wik Mungkan and other Wik dialects within a teaching program that acknowledges the value and appropriateness of both Wik and Standard Australian English.There is also an inter-language being spoken that is English based on the rules of Wik. Indigenous and non-Indigenous staff work with the students in identifying SAE, the inter-language and the best way to move forward, keeping in mind the goals of higher education and employment. Students and teachers now openly talk about how and why things are said; who is the audience; what might be the best Wild SAE response and how to get there.This meta approach is teaching staff about the difficulties faced by ESL students and is also teaching strong Wik speakers to operate in two worlds and know why and how they do it.The students are now more comfortable with taking risks to become better SAE speakers, while maintaining their very strong Wik language and culture.