$9 Million funding boost for endangered languages PDF Print E-mail

ATSIS staff met with FATSIL committee members in Canberra in November, to discuss planning initiatives for 2004.
ATSIS staff met with FATSIL committee members in Canberra in November, to discuss planning initiatives for 2004.
The board of ATSIC has announced that its support for Indigenous languages will be increased by an additional $3 million a year over 3 years, through the Endangered Languages Initiative.

Similar in principle to the previous Languages Access Initiatives Program, which was available for 3 years from June 1999, the Endangered Languages funds will run as a limited grant offer in addition to the annual funding budget through Preservation of Indigenous Languages (PILR) With funding for the 2003-04 financial year only released in the third quarter,ATSIS distributed the first year's allocation by calling for applications from previously funded language organisations. ATSIS has advised that the grant distribution process for the next year's funds will be widely advertised, to allow access by all groups wishing to apply.

Endangered languages have been defined as those with fewer than 20 fluent speakers.

ATSIS staff met with FATSIL committee members in Canberra in November, to discuss planning initiatives for 2004.

Back row from left: Shaun Edwards, Kate Battersby, Kevin Lowe, Melinda Holden, Garth Agius, Doris Paton, Samuel Aniba, Barbara McGillivray.

Front row: Luke Westenberg (ATSIS Adelaide), Julie Brady, Cohn Strand (ATSIS Canberra), Lester Coyne.

ATSIS backs DCITA initiative

ATSIS has joined with Dept. of Communications Information Technology and the Arts (DCITA) to provide a further $400,000 in support of the multimedia resource project announced last quarter.

Multilocus Interactive was awarded the tender to develop CD Roms and teaching resources for 5 remote

Indigenous communities through $400,000 provided from the Telecommunications Action Plan for Remote Indigenous Communities. Funds from the Endangered Languages Initiative have been identified to match the contribution from DCITA, bringing to 10 the number of languages supported by the project overall.The additional funding also introduces greater economies of scale to the project allowing for additional work to be conducted on each project.

No decision has yet been announced on which 5 languages will be the latest included in the project. ATSIC TV is producing a half hour documentary on the project, with negotiations for its broadcast on Imparja and on ABC TV as part of the Message Stick series.