Black Ink makes a splash PDF Print E-mail
Director of Yalga-binbi Institute for Community Development Lurleen Blackman with illustrator Lillian Fourmile after launching her book, 'How the Cassowary got it's Helmet'.
Director of Yalga-binbi Institute for Community Development Lurleen Blackman with illustrator Lillian Fourmile after launching her book, 'How the Cassowary got it's Helmet'.
North Queensland based publishing company, Black Ink Press, is doing its best to help individuals and community groups realize the dream of seeing their work in print. From offering workshops on illustrating and writing, to supporting cultural awareness through school presentations, Black Ink is putting a hand out to mentor budding artists and writers in developing creativity and publishing skills.

The group have recently published a collection of Indigenous poems and images entitled Crow Feathers, which features the work of twenty eight emerging writers and artists. Contributions for the book came from Queensland,Victoria and NSW.

They also have two attractive picture-story books on the market, How the Cassowary got its Helmet by Trevor and Lillian Fourmile, and Molly the Grey Kangaroo and the Bush Clean-up Crew by John L Clark. The Australia Council has funded Black Ink for a project envisioned by Bridget Priman and Robbie Paul, to make an interactive CD-ROM for language learning.

The collaborative work will combine visual art, writing and linguistics to develop high quality multi-media interactive activities which are effective indigenous language learning resources.

With funding for this project including a grant from the State Government Community Skills Development Program, Black Ink intend to create a web page and provide training in small communities in the region. The Yalga-binbi Institute for Community Development presents a successful model of a community organization accessing financial support through diverse funding sources.The group puts effort into training community members in a range of skills, and sharing the knowledge gained with other communities and project teams.

The project has been supported by Arts Queensland, the Foundation for Young Australians, the Australia Council for the Arts, Caritas Australia and the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Ecumenical Commission. But having almost run out, Black Ink is currently desperately seeking other sources.

If you would like to know more about Black Ink, please contact them on 07 4773 5077 or email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it